Ytterbium CAS 7440-64-4 YTTERBIUM STANDARD YTTERBIUM

Place of Origin: Sichuan,China (Mainland)
Brand Name: MOSINTER
Brand: MOSINTER
CAS: 7440-64-4
Appearance: Silver metal
Molecular weight: 173
Boiling point: 1196 °C
Heat of fusion: 7.66 kJ/mol
Molecular Formula: Yb
Density: 6.54 g/mL at 25 °C
Melting point: 824 °C
Alias: YTTERBIUM STANDARD

inquiry

skype basketAdd to Basket  Edit

Share |

Product Description

Payment & Shipping Terms Supply Capacity
Payment Terms:L/C, D/A, T/TProduction Capacity:50T/Year
Min. Order:15 KilogramPacking:According to customer...
Means of Transport:Ocean, Air, LandDelivery Date:with 7 days

Ytterbium (CAS: 7440-64-4)


Main Content :Yb/TREM >99.9%

RE Elements %  MAX

Non-RE Elements  %  MAX
La  0.0005Fe   0.0010
Pr  0.0001Ta   0.0005
Nd  0.0005Ni   0.0002
Sm  0.0010Ca   0.0010

Dy  0.0001

O    0.0165
Eu  0.0001

Co   0.0010

Gd  0.0001Mg   0.0020
Ce  0.0002Al   0.0010
Ho  0.0001Si   0.0005

Er  0.0002

Ti   0.0005
Tm  0.0001TREM  >99.56%

Lu  0.0002


Y   0.0002


Ytterbium is a chemical element with symbol Yb and atomic number 70. It is the fourteenth and penultimate element in the lanthanide series, or last element in the f-block, which is the basis of the relative stability of the +2 oxidation state. However, like the other lanthanides, the most common oxidation state is +3, seen in its oxide, halides and other compounds. In aqueous solution, like compounds of other late lanthanides, soluble ytterbium compounds form complexes with nine water molecules. Because of its closed-shell electron configuration, its density and melting and boiling points differ from those of the other lanthanides.

Applications


Source of gamma rays

The 169Yb isotope (with a half-life of 32 days), which is created along with the short-lived 175Yb isotope (half-life 4.2 days) by neutron activation during the irradiation of ytterbium in nuclear reactors, has been used as a radiation source in portable X-ray machines. Like X-rays, the gamma rays emitted by the source pass through soft tissues of the body, but are blocked by bones and other dense materials. Thus, small 169Yb samples (which emit gamma rays) act like tiny X-ray machines useful for radiography of small objects. Experiments show that radiographs taken with a 169Yb source are roughly equivalent to those taken with X-rays having energies between 250 and 350 keV. 169Yb is also used in nuclear medicine.

World's most stable atomic clock

Ytterbium clocks hold the record for stability with ticks stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).The clocks developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) rely on about 10,000 rare-earth atoms cooled to 10 microkelvin (10 millionths of a degree above absolute zero) and trapped in an optical lattice—a series of pancake-shaped wells made of laser light. Another laser that "ticks" 518 trillion times per second provokes a transition between two energy levels in the atoms. The large number of atoms is key to the clocks' high stability.

Doping of stainless steel

Ytterbium can also be used as a dopant to help improve the grain refinement, strength, and other mechanical properties of stainless steel. Some ytterbium alloys have rarely been used indentistry.


Category: Rare Earth and Rare Metals


«
Offline Showroom in USA
QR Code